Energy Fair Reviews
Well, not brand new. Solin recorded Energy Fair in late 2007, some copies were out in 2008, but the
album release party was only a couple of months ago. Semantics – good music is good music, and
Energy Fair is loaded with it.  The album cover doesn’t suggest a skiller pop craftsman, nor does
the daunting title of the opening track “Which Way To Sanity”. But by track two, the jangly “Take it
From The Top”, you’re ready to go the distance. And at nineteen tracks, you have miles to go!

Solin has a solid, appealing voice and doesn’t really sound like John Lennon incarnate, although
that might be the most frequent namedrop I’ve heard, probably because he portrayed Lennon in
an Off-Broadway Beatlemania show. (I’ve heard others suggest Parthenon Huxley and even a more
centered David Bowie, and I can’t against argue either.) If anything, the album is more often
channeling George Martin-isms, although you’d expect that kind of nick from someone who is a
producer himself.

”Strawberry Wine” really bleeds the influences, featuring “Penny Lane” trumpet, Ringo drum fills
and the slow march of voice over piano that Lennon would use on his more pensive numbers.
However, the result is anything but a Beatles cop; in fact it is more closely comparable to the
midtempo Memphis pop of Van Duren (even more eeriely reminiscent on the gorgeous “Diamond
Gold” and “Doesn’t Have To Be With You”). That’s a big compliment.

What I found remarkable about Energy Fair was the ability to keep up the pace for nineteen songs
without flagging, especially considering that the bulk of the tunes exceed the four minute mark.
While the slower tempo songs allow you to appreciate his lyrics and phrasing, the jaunty tracks like
“No Connection” (a favorite), “Adrienne” and “Robin” are just as appealing. Songs are catchy, but
not dumb-riff simple; there’s a lot of meat on these bones.

Nothing really rocks on this album with the exception of the 60s psych “Cuz I’m Yours” and
“Streets of Westville”, the latter a dark, brooding hybrid of Jim Morrison and Neil Young’s Crazy
Horse. Still, while it might sound fine blasting out your car window you’re not going to get anyone
dancing or flashing you the rock horns. But neither is it an album that demands quiet
introspection, as if the fragilty of the experience would be violated by sharing it outside your
personal space. Energy Fair is diverse and vibrant enough to be appealing under any circumstance.
If I heard this wafting across the fence I’d be more inclined to hop across and meet that new
neighbor.
New
Album!
Solin
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Scarf this
one up!
Sōlin alias P. Luciano can be proud to have worked with artists such as Aimee Mann, Jon Brion
or Roger McGuinn (Byrds). This has also made an impression on his second album. Here and
there are references, conscious or unconscious, that one can feel and hear. Obvious is also his
nearness to the husband of Aimee Mann, Michael Penn, and above all the Beatles', whom he also
thanks in the CD booklet, at least John Lennon and George Harrison. But let‘s concentrate now
on the 19 of song on “Energy fair”. The work of Sōlin is a fine thing, very harmonic and extremely
delicious, in addition, deep and moving. This includes and requires almost for contrasts. The 19
songs show a wide emotional spektrum. It ranges from balladesk to rocking, enriched with  fine
internmediate tones. Enough to to be infectious and enlight.
Sōlin Reviewed  by   Robert Pally    Swiss Records

«Energy fair» (Solin Music/www.solin1.com)

Sōlin alias P. Luciano darf sich damit brüsten, bereits mit Grössen wie Aimee Mann, Jon
Brion oder Roger McGuinn (Byrds) gearbeitet zu haben. Dies hat auf seinem Zweitwerk
seinen Niederschlag gefunden. Hier, da und dort sind Referenzen, bewusst oder unbewusst,
an diese Zusammenarbeiten herauszuhören- und zu spüren. Offenkundig ist aber auch seine
Nähe zum Ehemann von Aimee Mann, Michael Penn, und vor allem den Beatles, denen auch
im CD-Cover gedankt wird, zumindest John Lennon und George Harrison. Doch
konzentrieren wir uns nun auf die 19 Songs auf «Energy fair». Das Werk von Sōlin (übrigens
eine Kleinstadt in der kroatischen Gespanschaft Split-Dalmatien) ist eine feine Sache,
harmonisch überaus bekömmlich, aber auch tiefgehend und bewegend. Dies beinhaltet und
verlangt geradezu nach Kontrasten. So decken die 19 Songs eine gefühlsmässig breite Palette
ab. Von balladesk bis rockig reicht das Spektrum, gespickt mit feinen Zwischentönen, die
begeistern und anstecken.
Robert Pally
 Swiss Records
Translation:
Local CDs: 02/26/09        New Haven Advocate
Solin  reviewed
Tuesday, February 24, 2009
By Brian LaRue

Audio Extra: Listen to "Peace of Mind," by Brett Terry.

Solin, Energy Fair (Solin Music, solin1.com). First off, this is a daunting amount of music — 19
tracks, nearly 79 minutes. Thankfully, for all the bulk, this disc is surprisingly short on filler. In
fact, it doesn't seem to have any. Solin's songs call to mind the bright, ringing guitar-pop of the
mid-to-late-'60s (as well as the later '70s power-pop movement, which used that same period for
source material), but unlike so many retro-popsters, he refuses to pinch familiar licks outright.
The melodies feel natural and reflect a comfortably deep knowledge of craft. The arrangements
are dynamic and full, and the lyrics, which address love and growth and life changes and all that
stuff, often capture a strikingly vulnerable melancholia that makes the songs feel like more than
genre exercises. Solin goes on and on here without fumbling. If not for the consistency of the
production style, this could come off as a retrospective of career highlights instead of a single
studio album.

Solin plays a CD release show Feb. 27 at Cafe Nine.
Absolute Powerpop
http://absolutepowerpop.blogspot.com/2009/02/friday-night-roundup.html

A place to discover the latest and greatest in power pop releases.

Solin-Energy Fair. Solin (or Solin, Solin as he's sometimes billed) is a pop veteran who's played
John Lennon in off-Brodway Beatlemania, and shared the stage with the likes of Roger McGuinn,
Aimee Mann and Jon Brion. The good news is that he has the tunes to match his resume, both in
quality and length (18 tracks here). Bruce Brodeen at Not Lame compares him to P.Hux, and I'd
concur in that and I'd throw in some Chris von Sneidern and Jeremy Morris as well. There's a lot
to choose from here, but for my money the opening 1-2 of "Which Way to Sanity" and "Take it
from the Top" are the standouts here. "I Go Ghost" recalls the aforementioned Mr. Brion, and the
jangly "Robin" is another treat.
CD Baby | MySpace | iTunes

Solin-Energy Fair. Solin (or Solin, Solin as he's sometimes billed) is a pop veteran who's played
John Lennon in off-Brodway Beatlemania, and shared the stage with the likes of Roger McGuinn,
Aimee Mann and Jon Brion. The good news is that he has the tunes to match his resume, both in
quality and length (18 tracks here). Bruce Brodeen at Not Lame compares him to P.Hux, and I'd
concur in that and I'd throw in some Chris von Sneidern and Jeremy Morris as well. There's a lot
to choose from here, but for my money the opening 1-2 of "Which Way to Sanity" and "Take it
from the Top" are the standouts here. "I Go Ghost" recalls the aforementioned Mr. Brion, and the
jangly "Robin" is another treat.
I purchased Energy Fair by Solin. Best pleasure investment I’ve made in quite a while! Beyond a
unique, yet accomplished and extremely original musical score, the lyrical barrage unleashed by
Solin is nothing short of stellar. Not only is he a phenomenal musician, he is perhaps also one of
our leading 21st Century Poets! Outstanding effort!
Thank you Solin for delivering more than my money’s worth – a rare occurrence in this day and
age.
- Rick Frost
CD Baby Reviews
5 Stars... Stephen Luciano         
In these days on instant pop celebrities who like to promote themselves as
“artists” It is reaffirming when you actually hear a true artist. In his album
“Energy Fair” Sōlin’s artistry shines through on all musical fronts, first and most
significant the songs are great!
The lyrics convey life experience, pain, struggle, and happiness. The melodies are
wonderful and interesting and at times move to unexpected places. All the songs
“groove” hard, whether they are straight up rockers like “No Connection”
“Energy Fair” “Make Me Attractive” or Acoustic Pop like “Take it from the Top”
or “Diamond Gold”.
These song and most of the other songs on this album are not simple 3 chord
songs that happen to “Rock” and have great lyrics. They are harmonically
complex songs that happen to “Rock” and have great lyrics. One of the only 3
chord songs on the album is “I Go Ghost” which has a “haunting” melody (no
pun intended) with one of the 3 chords being a C# diminished chord. This is a
sound that is little used in pop music today; you have to go back to the Beatles as
one example to hear this sound in pop music. Which brings me to musical
influences: You can obviously hear the Beatles influence in Sōlin’s music,
particularly John Lennon, you can also hear Bowie, some R&B influence, Neil
Young, etc. No artist creates in a vacuum you can cite influence with anyone you
listen to, but I think all the songs on this album uniquely Sōlin. One of my
favorites is “Robin” which is a great song. I also love “Make Me Attractive” this
song has everything that appeals to me when I listen to music. It has great lyrics, a
hard groove an inventive chord structure and a very cool interlude with a
complex rhythmic phrase of multiple time signatures. When I mentioned Sōlin’s
artistry on “all fronts” I include his playing, Sōlin is a very fine guitarist (another
rarity among pop stars) and a great singer.
I hear a lot of comparison to Lennon, rightly so and a great compliment. I think
Sōlin’s talent can at least be compared with the great Stevie Wonder and Sting.
All these gifts in one person shine through beautifully on “Energy Fair”.
CD Baby review Steve bunovsky         
Energy Fair by Solin
One of my top 10 songwriters of all time - no kidding. Most people compare
Solin to John Lennon and you can definitely hear his influence but, in the
end, all the songs come out uniquely Solin - and it ends up being just that, an
influence. Solin is an original talent that deserves the same attention as any of
the greats. Energy Fair is an album that proves the independent music scene
can produce artists of the highest caliber. Listen to this album instead of the
drek forced down your throat by major record labels and t.v. producers- you
will save your soul.
Energy Fair
While cruising Aimee Mann’s My Space site, I came upon his music. Curious as
to who Aimee might have as her top friends I discover Solin. Immediately I was
hooked by a song called “No Connection” and after returning to his page time
and again (at first just to hear No Connection) I realized how powerful all his
posted ear candy is!

Compelled at this point to purchase his CD entitled “Energy Fair” I was again
struck by his mastery of melody. “Which Way to Sanity, Take it from the top,
Energy Fair, Make me attractive” all blew me away, I had a hard time tearing my
ears away just to get to track 13.”What is next to Be”, a favorite of mine he had
previously posted.

In a Lennon-esque vocal style, Solins lyrics are positive and down to earth.
“Robin” is a straight forward retrospective on a personal relationship that
typifies a connection many of us have experienced at one time or the other.
“Adrienne”, in a more modern musical arrangement, follows suit. This song
could and should have great commercial success.

Obviously influence by the Beatles, “Strawberry wine” sounds like it came direct
from the “Fab Four”: stashed away by Epstien or Martin only to be re-
discovered a half century later. I mean this only in tribute to Solin’s writing
abilities. My only criticism is that Energy Fair provides too much music for one
release!

On the darker side, “Streets of Westville” is the heaviest track on Energy Fair. I
have to mention this song, not only because I like it so much, but because it
reminds me of the musical sty lings of the late Bryan Harvey of the southern
gothic band, House of Freaks.

An in creditable independent album, I hope others will listen to Solin’s Energy
Fair for them-selves. Take it from the top, take it to your heart and you may also
find it takes a while to reach track 18!

Tom Trayn
CD Baby Reviews
Some great songs, real strong music, my favorites are "I Go Ghost" "Make Me
Attractive" "Strawberry Wine"
"Come On Let's Go" "Robin" "Doesnt Have To Be You" "Love Comes Once".
Definitely channeling John lovingly. Solin has a lennon aura about him, glad I
was able to find this special artist. One must seek out great music, thats
why we come to CD baby. Could you imagine(no pun intended) Solin going
unnoticed.
This is a must have!
Love Comes Just Once